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Author Topic: Aspirin shelf life  (Read 23997 times)
Hurricane
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« on: June 10, 2010, 03:02:47 am »

What is the expected shelf life of aspirin? I found a couple partial bottles from 04 and 05. They had not been stored in the classic 'cool dry place".

I would not use them for storage or kits, but could use them up now and let the newer stuff go into storage. I really don't use that much of it.

Thanks!
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Citizen Zero
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« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2010, 03:29:04 am »

Here's an interesting bit that I found on the shelf life of aspirin:
Quote
Bayer has never tested aspirin beyond four years, Mr. Allen says. But Jens Carstensen has. Dr. Carstensen, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin's pharmacy school, who wrote what is considered the main text on drug stability, says, "I did a study of different aspirins, and after five years, Bayer was still excellent. Aspirin, if made correctly, is very stable."

The entire article can be found here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/04/02/drug-expiration-part-one.aspx.

Hope this helps.
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Hurricane
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2010, 11:28:28 am »

Thanks, CZ !
 Smiley
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Cutter
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2010, 10:05:51 pm »

Good to know.  Aspirin is by far the best and safest pain killer IMO.  A couple of provisos.  Do not use aspirin if you are on a blood thinnner such as warfarin.  Also, I have heard rumors that there are a very few people that are actually allergic to aspirin.  I don't know if that one is true as I have never met such a person.

On the plus side, it is as Dr. Carstensen says, a very stable drug and has uses beyond pain management.  An 81 milligram Bayer aspirin is recommended for someone suspected of having a heart attack.  Apparently, the blood thinning characteristics of aspirin helps reduce damage from a heart attack.  Further, apparently 81 mg is the optimum dose for this.  Don't quote me on this one.  Those statements are based on information gleaned from Bayer commercials and as such are not reliable as anything but a sales tool.

I will try to find a citable source for those statements and will post it here if I find it.
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Debra
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2010, 01:12:55 am »

Yes, some people are allergic to aspirin....it has salicylate in it.  There are also foods which people who have an aspirin allergy should avoid.  Herbal Teas being one drink, certain vegetables such as:  cauliflower, mushrooms, spinaches, zuchini, broccoli..., peanuts and almonds and believe it or not, icecream.  There are other foods and condiments, but when a person finds out that they have this allergy, they usually are given a list of things to avoid or eat sparingly....you also should avoid willow bark....this was the "original" aspirin.....how do I know this....my sister has a salicylate allergy!

As for it being a blood thinner...this is correct also, my father takes one a day....and he had surgery today on his neck (two rods and plates inserted into his spine) and he had to be off the aspirin 10 days before the doctor would operate on him.  You take the risk of bleeding out when you are on any type of blood thinner....aspirin, coumadin, warfarin, etc....at my workplace, we are not allowed to use disposable razors on anyone who is being medicated with any type of blood thinner...the risk of nicking them is too great.  We use electric razors.
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Hurricane
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2010, 11:19:00 am »

Well I have tried some of those antique pills. Still here to tell about it. Seemed to work OK.
Thanks again!
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« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2010, 02:28:29 am »

A word on blood thinners.  They are not quite as deadly as they are made out to be as they apply to bleeding.  I don't dispute the prohibition against blade razors for blood thinner patients, but the danger is a bit overstated. 

My wife was on coumadin for several years.  Her dentist refused to even clean her teeth for fear of her bleeding to death if he nicked a gum! Her doctor advised us that this was a completely unfounded fear.  Blood thinner patients are more prone to bleeding and will bleed more freely than those not on thinners, but minor cuts are not life threatening.

There are also certain drugs that will quickly counteract the effects of blood thinners.  I know this because we were trying to have a baby while she was on blood thinners.  They said there would be no serious problems with delivery because they could both plan the birth by C-section and could also counteract the blood thinners if a little one were to decide to get in a hurry and come early.  She was switched from coumadin to heparin because coumadin has the nasty side effect of causing birth defects that are life threatening to both child and mother.

As it happens, there was no need to worry because we are incapable of having children.  God's will, I still have my niece and nephew which is good enough for me.  Who knows?  Perhaps it was for their benefit that my wife and I were unable to have our own.
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Debra
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« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2010, 11:32:35 am »

hahahah...most of the time I agree with you...but I don't agree with your doctor...maybe he should be the one who actually does the "care" on the nicked person!  You can see a little bitterness here...hahahah!   I know first hand how much more folks bleed when on blood thinner......we are very careful with our patients...some might be able to heal more quickly, but when you add other complications such as diabetes and age on to this, it compounds the problem.  I would rather be cautious then take a chance.  I do have a little bitterness I guess, because in the field I work in, I see a high disregard for the less "lovely" folks in life.... (I just got yelled at by a doctor the other day, for I KNOW that one person is having a medical problem....and that person can't communicate normally (I can understand him because I work with him) and when the doctor asked the person some medical questions, the person didn't respond correctly, so I answered for him....and then the Doctor chewed me out royally!  and the patient walked away with out being treated for his problem. 
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Cutter
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2010, 02:36:35 am »

Actually, I have rendered wound care for someone who was on blood thinners and got nicked and even more serious, but still superficial, cuts more than once.  I do understand where you are coming from and sympathize.

I think the difference is that while my wife was on blood thinners, she was otherwise in excellent health.  The folks you are dealing with are fighting multiple problems in most cases.  Shoot, simple aging makes things like cuts more serious.  Add in things like diabetes, anemia, organs not performing anywhere near optimal levels, and any number of other things; and you have the makings of a real bad situation.  Even if a person has no significant problems aside from advanced age, cuts are bad.

You are also in the unenviable position of shaving someone other than yourself.  Having done it myself, shaving somebody else is difficult at best.  Most times are not the best because the person being shaven does not have absolute trust in the person doing the shaving.  A nervous person makes the proposition so much harder.  It could be worse.  You could have to use a straight razor.  It is what I shave with. 
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Yea, though I walk through the Valley of the Shadow of Death; I will fear no evil, for Thou art with me. -- Psalm 23
Debra
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« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2010, 08:06:46 am »

Your absolutely right.....and fortunately for me, I seldom work in direct care now...but I still remember the patient who would try to bite  the razor...and often times the person would succeed....that was such a tricky situation....for they were what we call a "bleeder"   but luckily the tongue heals quickly....it would take several of us to shave that person...now folks might wonder why we would shave such a combative person....it's because the state considers an unshaven, unkempt person  as being neglected and we could be charged as such.....personally, i would have preferred to let them grow a beard....hahaha!
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